Posted tagged ‘joey Bats’

Jays Journaling (Could I could get sued for that title?)

March 23, 2020

I miss baseball.

I miss it so much.

COVID-19 can go fuck itself.

One of the worst things about the Coronavirus is that the items we use for escape have been shutdown. It’s messed up, but we have to move forward. We have no choice.

Anyway, I’ve got a few things swimming around my head. Some of it was written before the shit hit the fan. So please bear with the mish, the mash and the combined mish-mash.

***

So this is baseball amidst a global pandemic.

It was inevitable once the NBA suspended play. I patiently waited for the other sports to follow. Now we are stuck in a hideous holding pattern.

It’s terrible, but it is the right course of action. It would’ve been incredibly selfish and foolish if MLB chose to defy the other leagues and proceeded accordingly.

Not worried about how the schedule will be restructured. That will work itself out. Maybe we’ll experience a World Series in December (not likely).

I am thinking about the part-staff that work at the games: Ushers, security, food and beverage, hype crews, ticket takers, box office staff, etc. Very pleased to see the Jays working with the MLSE clubs to create a fund for those affected. Don’t forget about those working in restaurants and bars around Skydome. And don’t forget about your hot dog vendors either. When this storm clears, I hope prosperity can return.

***

You might’ve heard that Jose Bautista was supposed to be playing for the Dominican Republic at an upcoming Olympic qualifying tournament. From all accounts, he would’ve been at first base. However, it appeared he was also trying to reinvent himself as a two-way player.

That’s right! Joey Bats is/was attempting to become a pitcher and I think that’s BRILLIANT!

I’m sure many scoffed and rolled their eyes at the notion. But to paraphrase Talk Talk, “It’s his life. Don’t you forget.”

So what if he’s turning 40 this fall? So what if the analytics aren’t in his favour? So what if evolution caught up to him on the offensive side?

If Joey Bats wants to pitch, I’m all for it. If he still has that passion, a desire to compete and his body can handle it, then who are we to say no?

It’s silly to expect him to be a Max Scherzer or Mariano Rivera. But I certainly hope he finds success with this endeavour; whether that’s in the majors, indy ball or any league outside of North America.

Besides, transitioning to a pitcher gave Anthony Gose another shot.

***

Could we dial back on the Reese McGuire parking lot jokes?

It’s getting ridiculous.

The kid did something very stupid and (hopefully) feels awful about it.

If there’s one thing our society excels at it’s kicking someone when they’re down. I’m as guilty of it as you are.

I’m not saying we should ignore what allegedly happened, but it would be better to simply acknowledge the situation and let the legal process run its course. There could be a mental health or addiction issue at play.

I realize this request will be in vain, but I figured I’d make it anyway.

***

The cheating scandal involving the Houston Astros is detrimental. Personally, I would’ve stripped them of the 2017 World Series title. Alas, the Commissioner did not feel that was necessary.

What occurred at Minute Maid Park was horrible. However, in a twisted kind of way, it was also a good thing.

A story is more intriguing when there’s a villain.

And the Astros are THE villains of the season. Wherever they go, there will be hype and interest. Such excitement will lead to increased ticket sales and more eyeballs watching the TV.

Remember when A.J. Burnett returned as a New York Yankee in 2009 and faced Roy Halladay? Skydome was nearly packed and the atmosphere appeared to be electric.

All because Burnett was a villain who left the Jays to play for the evil empire.

Why else are we – as Jays fans – obsessed with the Yankees and Red Sox? It’s because they’re villains and we want to witness them fail.

Now Houston’s been added to that mix.

It would not surprise if the Jays’ home series against the Astros – whenever it happens – will be one of the most attended. It’s the best chance for fans to jeer the villains.

And just imagine if Houston embraces the villain-role. Just imagine if they reach the World Series. The ratings and ticket sales will take off like a rocket.

Ca-ching 💰💰💰

***

Officially rooting for Patrick Murphy.

I hope you read Arden Zwelling’s article about the young hurler. The poor kid has had an injury setback and a metaphoric breaking ball thrown at him.

Love to see Murphy overcome all these obstacles and find success at the big league level.

Alejandro Kirk has also piqued my interest. Of course, it’s likely we won’t see him at Skydome any time soon.

Nevertheless, he was gaining a lot of traction and attention. Then again, I am a sucker for unique characters.

***

Please be patient with Nate Pearson. The worst thing we can do is set over-the-top expectations.

I’m begging you.

ER

Return of the Right Fielder

July 10, 2018

The epicenter of the resurgence returned home as a visitor.

Odd seeing him wear the uniform of the Metropolitans.

Standing on the field where he blossomed, there are standing ovations and video tributes.

All richley deserved.

I smile at the memories, but feel sadness when he pulls out a defensive alignment card.

It’s not the same club he once played for.

It isn’t the same group that captivated the nation.

This is evolution.

This is a team in transition.

He is getting older and that means I am getting older.

So I cling to the memories and wonder if he does the same.

ER

I took all my thoughts and feelings about Jose Bautista, put them in a slow cooker and this was the result.

November 3, 2017

For as much as we criticize JP Ricciardi – and it is warranted – the former Blue Jay General Manager does deserve high praise for acquiring two of the biggest impact players in team history: Edwin Encarnacion and the subject of this article, Jose Bautista.

I was there on Sunday, September 24 and said goodbye to Joey Bats. No surprise, it was incredibly hard to hold back tears as he walked off the field, hugging his teammates and saluting the crowd. It was a beautiful send-off.

A lot has been written about his tenure. Lists have been compiled and opinions have been shared. It’s hard to add something to an already large pile. But Bautista had affected many and here’s what his impact meant to me:

One of my earliest memories of him is from June 2009. The Blue Jays were playing the Phillies and Bautista teamed up with Aaron Hill to hit back-to-back homeruns. As I watched him round the bases from my seat in the 500s, I observed the unique occurrence.

“Look at that,” I thought to myself. “Bautista, the backup utility player, hit a homerun. That’s something you don’t see everyday.”

Shortly a year later, Bautista bombs were going off regularly.

To understand the importance of Bautista’s 54-homer campaign in 2010, one needs to remember the mood around Skydome at the time.

Things were looking bleak; very bleak. The team had practically hit rock bottom. Actually, if there was a level below “rock bottom,” the Jays were there.

A frustrating 2009 season ended with three straight losses to Baltimore and reports of a mutiny against Cito Gaston. AA took over general managing duties and in his first offseason, traded franchise icon Roy Halladay to Philadelphia.

The calendar changed to 2010 and “Hustle+Heart” was used to soften the blow of uncertainty. The playoff drought was going to continue with no end in sight. Making matters worse, the team was averaging around 10,000 fans early in the season. The sight of a stadium only 20% full was hollow and made some wonder if this was the beginning of the end.

But then Bautista started to hit homeruns and we all took notice. Suddenly, amongst the scorched ruin, a small, glowing spark emerged. Jose was that small, glowing spark.

Suddenly, the fate of the team wasn’t a concern anymore. There was hope. There was promise; all thanks to that glowing spark. Sure, the Jays were far from a playoff contender; but at least we could turn on the television or go to a game and say, “I can’t wait to see what Jose is going to do tonight.” He brought excitement when things were looking bleak.

2010 was also weird year for me. I guess one could call it a quarter life crisis. Certain doors closed and others opened. Through out it all was the stinging feeling of life not going the way I expected it go. In my head, I was failing at life.

So when I saw that former back-up utility player – whose arrival to the team in 2008 brought an unenthusiastic “meh” from the fan base – become a superstar slugger, I invested every ounce of passion and emotion. I was at the ground floor of something special and unlike other important moments and players of Blue Jay lore, I was not going to take it for granted.

One Friday evening, I was at Skydome for a match between the Jays and Cleveland. The weather was perfect that night. My friend and I sat in the 500s, behind home plate – one of my favourite sports to watch a game.

Midway through the match, the Jays loaded the bases and Jose – already in the midst of his incredible season – came to the plate. There were about 19,000 fans in attendance and excitement began to grow.

“I hope he hits a grand slam,” I thought to myself. “Please, I need this.”

Then he connected for – I believe – his 36th homerun of the season. The crowd erupted! 19,000 fans sounding like 50,000 fans and I was one of them. I wasn’t thinking about my struggles and failures. I was smiling and feeling lucky that I was there and part of the experience. No anger or fear for the rest of the night. Maybe things will be okay.

I am grateful for Joey Bats because he gave me an escape.

From there, it all came together: Edwin’s rise to stardom, the big trades, the arrival of Stroman, Sanchez and Osuna, Donaldson’s MVP season. Yes, there were setbacks; but the prize of two exciting playoff runs was worth the pain.

The batflip will always maintain it’s iconic status in Canadian sports mythology. The image of Bautista sending his bat to another galaxy will sit in the same category as Paul Henderson’s Summit Series goal in 1972, Sydney Crosby’s golden goal and of course, Joe Carter’s World Series winning blast.

This chapter of Blue Jays history began when AA became the General Manager. However, the epicentre of the story revolves around Jose Bautista.

Without Joey Bats, every moment and feeling never occurs. Just imagine what things would look like. All it took was a minor league catcher, an adjustment to his swing and some good fortune.

Evolution caught up to Bautista the past two seasons. So since it’s likely the end, I thank him for everything he did for the team and the city.

If the Blue Jays ultimately win the World Series in the next ten years, Jose Bautista would obviously not get a ring. However, he will have played an integral role in the journey.

All the best, Mr. Bats.

ER

Pending a physical…

January 17, 2017

Blue Jay fans rejoice.
Bautista is coming back.
More bats shall be flipped.

ER

Hot Take Haiku

July 14, 2016

Listen carefully 
Joey Bats will not be traded
So calm the f**k down

ER


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