Posted tagged ‘jays’

Retro Blue Jays – Hit the showers, Jimmy

September 14, 2017

Posted by Travis Doucette and Retrontario.

It appears the hot water supply at Exhibition Stadium was worth bragging about.

Here are a couple of Ontario Hydro commercials featuring the Blue Jays. Based on the sleeve patches, it appears the ads were filmed mostly in 1984 (Thank you, Mr. Creamer).

The first commercial features three Blue Jay hurlers – Jim Gott, Roy Lee Jackson and Jimmy Key – soaking their troubles away.

The second one shows the Jays laying into a team of scrubs. Willie Upshaw delivers the knock out punch with a homerun that makes its way to Nathan Philips Square.

Not sure if that’s even geographically possible.

 

ER

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Can we PLEASE stop dissecting Roberto Osuna’s struggles?

September 7, 2017

Trying to figure out why Roberto Osuna has struggled carries no benefit whatsoever. 

Barring a biblical comeback, the Blue Jays are not making the playoffs. Therefore, everything from now until the end of the regular season is a moot point. So why bother making a big deal about the blown saves? 

I am not an expert, nor do I have access to the clubhouse. Maybe he’s tired and that would be completely understandable. He’s done more the past three seasons then some players have done in an entire career. He warrants a chance to figure things out and clearly deserves a break once the season finishes. Don’t forget that the Jays have played an additional month in back-to-back seasons. That’s a lot of extra baseball. 

That doesn’t necessarily mean to ignore the issue. But to worry about it now when everything is fait accompli is pointless. If the struggles continue into the 2018 season, than we can start having discussions. 

So until then, kindly cool it. You’re only wasting oxygen. Shit happens and we all go through slumps. 

Seriously, just leave the poor guy alone.

ER

Seriously, you all need to cool it with the mean tweets directed at Sportsnet personalities

August 20, 2017

If there’s one thing that irks me about my fellow Blue Jay fans, it would be how they get upset over the smallest, off-the-field things. Now I’m not 100% innocent myself, but there are certain causes that have been taken up on Twitter and Facebook that have me perplexed. One popular cause is the constant bashing of Sportsnet reporters and broadcasters.

Every day, it seems I always come across nasty comments such as…

“Buck and Tabby are the worst.”
“Zaun’s an idiot.”
“Wilner’s a schill for Rogers.”
“[On-field reporter] is boring.”

Sorry, I just don’t understand why the quality of these personalities is so damn important. They bode no affect on the team’s performance, nor do they heavily influence my decision on how I  consume Jays content.

Now there’s nothing wrong with poking a little fun at the expense of the people on the mic and in front of the camera. Remember “Buck Blunders?” Does that still exist? However, the stuff I’ve seen lately is over the top and malicious.

Now before this post gets too preachy, here are four items to consider before you decide to rip a SNET personality:

1. If [insert personality’s name] was really terrible, he/she wouldn’t have a job with Sportsnet. Lets be serious: The producers don’t base their hiring decisions on a game of darts.

2. Any commentary is just one person’s opinion. It is not, nor will it ever be gospel. So when Gregg Zaun says something, either agree or disagree and then move on. There’s no reason to lose it online.

3. If you don’t like Buck Martinez and Pat Tabler, then just watch the opponents’ broadcast, press the mute button or listen to the radio broadcast. Are they as good as Vin Scully or – for local flavour – Don Chevrier? Of course not and that’s perfectly fine. The quality of Buck and Tabby is not a top priority and I really don’t understand why some focus on this obsession. By the way, ever notice how everyone craps on the TV broadcast, but there’s never one positive comment made about the radio broadcast? I haven’t listened to every radio team in MLB, but I have heard a few and Jerry Howarth, Mike Wilner and Joe Siddal stand above them.

4. Be honest: How much venom is rooted in jealousy? Admit it! You resent the fact that – for example – Wilner’s job is cooler than yours. I have no problem admitting I’m jealous of him. Wilner’s paid to live and breathe baseball. It’s natural to feel a little resentful when someone has the dream career and you’re stuck with a job that isn’t as satisfying. We’re human beings after all.

Of course, hiding behind an avatar is like liquid courage. So I’m not expecting anyone to stop this kind of behaviour. It’s just irritating when fans complain about irrelevant off-field things.

Then again, perhaps I should just press the mute button.

ER

Hate to admit it, but I’ve made peace with the 2017 Blue Jays

July 13, 2017

The consensus was unanimous: The four remaining series before the all-star break would give a strong indication of whether the Blue Jays would be buyers or sellers at the non-waiver trade deadline.

Baltimore came in and the Jays made Kevin Gausman and Ubaldo Jimenez look like Cy Young and Walter Johnson.

The Red Sox were next and they steamrolled their way to a three-game sweep.

So the Jays flew to New York and took two out of three from the Yankees. A pleasant surprise to say the least.

Finally, it was time to face Houston. While splitting a four-game series against the best team in MLB is certainly a positive, it was the weirdest split I have ever seen. Two wins that featured strong pitching and clutch swings. Two losses where they were completely out-classed and out-matched by the Astros.

So what does it all mean?

The pessimists feel the window of opportunity has closed and it’s time to “blow it up.” The optimists feel they still have a fighting chance. They will also point to the trade deadline of 2015, when the team was hovering around the .500 mark before AA acquired Tulo and David Price.

I find myself in the middle of these conflicting opinions; and while I choose not to fully commit to one side, I have reached a more comforting consensus:

I have made peace with the 2017 Blue Jays.

Making peace means that I accept the high probability that they won’t make the playoffs. It also means that I accept that there will likely be some form of re-tooling or rebuilding and key pieces from the 2015 and 2016 playoff runs could be traded.

Making peace is my way of softening the blow. It allows me to be disappointed, but not overly upset. If the Jays flounder their way to the end of the regular season, I will still be able to enjoy the matches.

I guess one could call it self-preservation. It is definitely not the right way of handling things; nor is it the wrong way. It’s just my way.

Of course, I hope I’m wrong and the Jays go an incredible run in the second half. But if that doesn’t happen – and a strong argument could be made that things will not get better – then I’m ready for it without any anger or frustration.

Just remember: Nothing is truly guaranteed.

ER

Homerun DNA

July 6, 2017

Russell Martin faces the reporters
wearing his uniform and exhaustion

He answers a question about his game-tying homerun,
which bounced in a fortunate way
and a blast from Morales that nearly landed where baseballs rarley go.

The present scribes already know the answer;
yet the veteran catcher reluctantly responds

“It’s kind of our DNA. We love the longball.”

Invisible prophecies advise winning teams to perform “small ball”
because one cannot simply rely on a homerun

The prophecies reign true
But primal nature
craves for a mighty swing that yeilds a majestic flight
and a precious souvenir to the adoring public

Manufactured runs lead to victories
But homeruns create fables and memories.

ER

A short note about Roberto Osuna

June 27, 2017

It was a tough weekend, n’est-ce pas?

When I found out Roberto Osuna was dealing with anxiety, it was like getting hit by a sack of bricks. Afterall, he’s only 22-years-old.

I enthusiastically applaud Osuna for speaking out. That took an incredible amount of strength and could not have been an easy decision to make. 

It was great to see him pitch the final frame of Sunday’s victory; and like you, I wish him only the very best. His health is far more important than wins/losses and whether he’s available out of the bullpen or not.

ER


40 in 40: UNIQUELYEST (sic) Blue Jays

June 15, 2017

The folks at Sportsnet recently invited us to submit a list of the 40 greatest Blue Jays from the past 40 seasons. Like you, I will sit down in front of a computer and spend many agonizing hours putting together a list. I’m very excited for the vicious internal debates I intend to have with myself.

But first…

I recently created a list of the most unique players to ever wear a Jays uniform. Remarkably, I managed to come up with 40 names.

So what criteria did I use when creating the 40 “uniquelyest” Blue Jays?

I essentially followed three rules:

Rule #1 – A player would not be considered if he was already on the 60-player shortlist that was put together by Sportsnet.

Rule #2 – Stats be damned.

Rule #3 – Go nuts.

These are Blue Jays who are memorable for reasons other than being an all-star, a slugger, an ace or unstoppable reliever. They’re on my list because they were “blue collar” players, had famous dispositions or had one or a few “15 minutes of fame” moments. Heck, some made the list for simply having great hair, awesome facial and bodily features or just a cool name. I’ve even included some that became infamous.

By no means is this list perfect. In fact, it’s really a toss up after the top three. Almost all of the players on this list are from the early 90s and up. That’s simply because I wasn’t alive in the 70s and wore diapers in the 80s. I also doubt this list would ever lead to a documentary by Fadoo Productions.

Anyway, here are the 40 uniquelyest Blue Jays in team history! Questions and/or clarifications? You know where to find me. Feel free to make your own list.

  1. John McDonald
  2. Munenori Kawasaki
  3. Doug Ault
  4. Joe Biagini
  5. Jeff Frye
  6. Brandon Morrow
  7. A.J. Burnett
  8. R.A. Dickey
  9. Reed Johnson
  10. Frank Catalanotto
  11. Marco Scutaro
  12. Steve Delabar
  13. Jason Grilli
  14. Travis Snider
  15. Charlie O’Brien
  16. Matt Stairs
  17. Joe Inglett
  18. Mike McCoy
  19. Shea Hillenbrand
  20. J.P. Arencibia
  21. Sal Fasano
  22. Brett Lawrie
  23. Rick Bosetti
  24. Dustin McGowan
  25. Colby Rasmus
  26. Gustavo Chacin
  27. Gregg Zaun
  28. Scott Downs
  29. Craig Grebeck
  30. Rob Butler
  31. Marc Rzepczynski
  32. Willie Canate
  33. John-Ford Griffin
  34. B.J. Ryan
  35. Brian Tallet
  36. Russ Adams
  37. Jon Rauch
  38. Brandon League
  39. Marty Jenzen
  40. Mauro Gazzo

ER


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