Short, scribbled thoughts about the trades that pissed you all off

Posted August 7, 2019 by The Hek
Categories: Articles, Blue Jays

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Yup, last week was nuts. Anyway…

  • Stro’s trade made sense. Would’ve been a waste of his talent to keep him while the Jays are still rebuilding.
  • The deal with Houston is puzzling. Aaron Sanchez was finally starting to build his value back up. If that value continued to rise, he would’ve likely yielded a higher return during the off-season or at next year’s trade deadline. That’s why dealing him now feels premature.
  • The focus should be on pitching. That’s why acquiring Derek Fisher was also puzzling. Russ Atkins really, really, REALLY wanted him and was willing to pay a high price. Poor Fisher is going to be scrutinized to death by this angry fanbase; so here’s hoping he lives up to the potential that Atkins envisions. Reminds me of when AA sent Travis Snider – very popular with fans – to Pittsburgh for Brad Lincoln.
  • I’m glad the small gambles they took on Sogard, Phelps and Hudson yielded/will yeild some younger talent.
  • Of course, it’s very sad to say goodbye to the players that were dealt away. However, I’m thrilled they all get to play for teams making strong playoff pushes, especially Stro, Sanchez and Joe Biagini. They deserve it!
  • Not surprisingly, many fans – aka the anti-Shapiro crowd – were furious with the return the Jays got. Before Anthony Kay, Simeon Woods Richardson and the other acquisitions even reported to their new teams, it seemed like some fans were already labeling them as busts. I understand the anger, but it is absolutely RIDICULOUS to declare these new players as failures before they have a chance to actually fail; if they actually do fail. Honestly, it didn’t matter who the front office got in return. The anti-Shapiro crowd wasn’t going to like it. It was pre-determined.

To be honest, Jays Twitter really pisses me off at times. But that’s for another post….maybe.

ER

Advertisements

Unreal: The Marcus Stroman Era

Posted July 30, 2019 by The Hek
Categories: Articles, Blue Jays

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Where to begin?

June 2012: I’m driving home, listening to Jays Talk. It’s the night of the MLB Draft.

Mike Wilner introduces the Jays’ first round pick and proceeds to interview him. This was my introduction to Marcus Stroman; my introduction to Height Doesn’t Measure Heart.

The bravado and confidence instantly hit me. This kid had a chip on his shoulder and a desire to be the greatest pitcher ever. My attention was caught.

I fell in love with his swagger that night. And to this day, I still love it.

There’s certainly a group of fans who loathed that Stro swag. I like to think those individuals represent a segment of Toronto sports fans who expect every single athlete to perform, say little and stay in their lane. Believe me, there’s nothing wrong with that. But if you expect everyone to follow that example then a) you’re going to be disappointed more often and b) it dulls things up.

Whether you liked him or not, baseball is much cooler with Marcus Stroman. You need a strong personality like his. It enhances the drama and adds flavour to the narrative. Take that out and while the sport maintains a level of fun and excitement, it looks robotic. Even the not-so-subtle jabs he’s thrown at Mark Shapiro and Russ Atkins on Twitter have been entertaining.

We should talk about all that “commotion.”

Stro’s greatest asset and his greatest flaw is that he cares a lot. What he specifically cares about is for another article. Make no mistake though; he is PASSIONATE. That passion is beneficial in some areas and causes problems in others. That’s why you won’t see him hanging out with Shapiro and Atkins at a New York City nightclub in the next decade or so.

Similar to a lot of Blue Jay fans, perhaps Stro didn’t want to let go of 2015-16. Can’t blame him at all. It’s hard coming down from that mountain. Some accept and embrace fate. Some do it kicking and screaming. Of course, we’ll never know what actually happened or what was said. Our personal biases will simply fill in the blanks.

When it was evident the Jays needed a rebuild, I hoped Stro would be one of the few players from 2015-16 still on the roster when things turned around. But once the rebuild was in full effect, I made peace with the notion that keeping Stro would hinder the team’s growth.

It’s a classic battle of head vs. heart, with my noggin coming out on top.

I would love it if Stro was signed to a long-term deal. However, my biggest fear is that his best years would be while the team was still rebuilding.

Hate to say it, but it would’ve been counter-productive to keep Stro. If his stock is high, it was worth trying to obtain some younger talent in exchange. It’s similar to what happened with Roy Halladay ten years ago.

We all wanted Doc to stay, but while his productivity was at the top, the Jays as a whole were sliding to the bottom and needed to rebuild. It wasn’t fair to Doc who – at that point – had never tasted postseason action and ultimately requested to be traded. Keeping him would’ve slowed the team’s growth.

It’s great how Stro embraced the city, but he should pitch for a winner. And yes, the team he was traded to is hanging on by a very thin thread. Nevertheless, I certainly wish him the best of luck with the Mets and thank the heavens he’s not wearing Yankee pinstripes.

HDMH will always have a significant place in Toronto. From his debut, to the freak injury, coming back from that injury, being part of the magic that was 2015-16 and being one of the few bright spots during seasons of transition and development. Marcus Stroman’s narrative was simply unreal. He fell in love with the city and the city – at least a good portion of it – fell in love with him.

ER

Optioned to AAA: A Baseball Microstory

Posted July 22, 2019 by The Hek
Categories: Baseball Microstories

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

A bitter professional baseball player boarded the final Greyhound shuttle just after midnight. He was going back to the minors; optioned to AAA.

“We know you’re working hard,” his manager told him. “But things are getting tight and we just can’t wait it out.”

The manager wasn’t wrong. His struggles were well-documented.

But he had nothing to prove in the minors and hated giving up the sweet nectar of major league luxury.

So with the emergency exit within reach, he considered instant retirement.

The worst kind of anger is when you’re furious with the person you see in a mirror.

ER

Retro Blue Jays: When 60 wins was the benchmark

Posted July 3, 2019 by The Hek
Categories: Blue Jays, Retro

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Posted by Retrontario.

Given the current state of affairs, this might put a smile on your face…or make you angrier.

Whatever.

It’s a City-TV/CityPulse sportscast from September 12, 1980, detailing the Jays’ 7-5 win over Baltimore. It was a significant achievement, marking the first time the team had recorded 60 victories.

Look how much fun Peter Gross was having. He was fully aware the team was in last place at the time and didn’t care. He’s not whining or reminding the viewer how bad things are/were, nor is he begrudgingly talking about the Jays. Don’t hear him shitting on the front office or calling anyone tone deaf either. Maybe he’s being a little sarcastic, but he’s also embracing the pain.

Check out how the highlights are presented. They’re all from one solitary camera, stationed behind home plate at Exhibition Stadium. It’s literally one angle, one point of view. A strong reminder of a time when not every single game was televised.

ER

Injured, But Optimistic

Posted June 3, 2019 by The Hek
Categories: Baseball Poetry Project, Blue Jays

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

I am envious of your optimism

Teach me to live that way

You tore your ACL,
after the second forearm injury,
after the first forearm injury,
after a serious head injury,
after several demotions,
after being undrafted,
and there you stand, holding a half-full glass

Teach me to live that way

Those setbacks would make me bitter, angry
More antisocial than I already am
I would want nothing but isolation and revenge
Setting the field on fire, when you only pounded it

This is why you are paid to pitch and I pay to watch it.

Bottle your positivity
You could sell millions!

Teach me to live that way

I am envious

ER

Top-rated prospect

Posted May 22, 2019 by The Hek
Categories: Baseball Poetry Project, Blue Jays

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Electricity; produced by thousands

The young messiah has finally arrived;
with heavy expectations, a legendary pedigree and a high pedestal

We stand when he comes out to stretch,
when a ground ball comes his way and for every at-bat

This is history

The moment of moments

Whip out your phone to capture it

It’s a playoff atmosphere for a late-april match

Cheers rain down for balls; anger for called strikes

One pitch flies high and tight

In our minds, we grab our pitchforks and torches

Line drive down the first base line

An eruption that’s prolonged as he’s removed for a pinch runner

And in true baseball fashion, his teammate with a .179 average hits a walkoff homerun

ER

Embrace The Pain

Posted May 15, 2019 by The Hek
Categories: Articles, Blue Jays

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

I guess it came to me while the Blue Jays were getting their asses handed to them by the Twins last week:

You can scream and complain about things you have no control of……or you can embrace the pain and let the narrative play itself out.

Let things develop organically before forming an opinion. Maybe things work out successfully or fail miserably. We won’t know until it happens and we have to let it happen without rushing it. It’s okay to let time pass. It’s said that Rome wasn’t built in a day and the same goes for this rebuild.

Perhaps you’ll be a better fan for it. Heck, our friends in New England and the north side of Chicago endured decades of pain. In a way, it became a badge of honour. So what’s stopping us from following that path?

Of course, I want to see them win. Nobody wants their team to lose. But reality doesn’t lie and it drives me crazy how some desperately hold on to 2015/16, refuse to acknowledge that the window of opportunity closed, jump to conclusion and demand for instant gratification. But that’s their prerogative. I have to accept it the same way I hope they’d accept my train of thought.

So the next time they get their asses handed to them, consider this:

Don’t be afraid of losing.
Don’t be afraid of a rebuild
Don’t be afraid of low attendance
Don’t be afraid if Vladdy doesn’t set the world on fire this season.
Don’t be afraid of the darkness.
It’s only baseball. It’s not life.
It’s going to be alright.

ER


%d bloggers like this: